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Individual research recommendation details

Recommendation details

Recommendation ID: CG152/2
Question: Enteral nutrition:- What are the benefits, risks and cost effectiveness of enteral nutrition compared with glucocorticosteroid treatment in adults and children?
Page: 23
Any explanatory
notes (if applicable):
Why this is important:- Previous studies in adults suggest that glucocorticosteroid treatment is more effective at inducing remission than enteral nutrition in adults with Crohn's disease, but some small paediatric studies suggest that growth and mucosal healing may be better following treatment with enteral nutrition. In clinical practice enteral nutrition is often used to avoid the side effects of glucocorticosteroid treatment in children. There is little information about the relative effects on quality of life, bone density or cost effectiveness. Randomised controlled trials should be conducted in children and adults with an inflammatory exacerbation of Crohn's disease to compare the effects of enteral nutrition and glucocorticosteroid treatment on these parameters and also the effect on growth in children. Mucosal healing could also be assessed in a subgroup of participants. It is not ethical or practical to conduct a randomised controlled trial of enteral nutrition versus placebo.

Source guidance details

Comes from guidance: Crohn's disease
Number: CG152
Date issued: Oct 2012

Research needed into:

Effectiveness of treatment: No
Cost of treatment: No
Implementation of treatment: No
Quality of life: No
Methods of research: No

Other details

Is this a recommendation for the use of a technology only in the context of research?: No
Is it a recommendation that suggests collection of data or the establishment of a register?: No
Recommendation priority: Unrated
Recommendation status: Research Pending
Notes: 0
Date this record updated: 30-10-2012

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This page was last updated: 20 March 2014

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Copyright 2014 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All rights reserved.